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Archive for June, 2011

Eaglemanz Communiqué’s: Cobell Settlement: A knife in our backs.

“Real justice for these Indians may still lie in the distant future; it may never come at all. This reality makes a statement about our society and our form of government that we should be unwilling to let stand.” Judge Royce Lamberth

Those prophetic words by Lamberth became a reality on June 20 when the federal court in Washington, DC approved the Cobell settlement.

There is much ado how this was a major victory as in a David and Goliath scenario. However, one only needs to read in between the fine print to know this was a serious setback.
I had already suspected it was a foregone conclusion when the settlement was first announced and Obama signed off on it. This was an easy out for the government; they secured the victory, not us. Go To Ben’s Blog To Read Full Story

Excerpt from Ben Carnes’ Blog – Eaglemanz Communiqué’s
(c) copyright 2011

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Rosina and Geraldine Philippe of the Atakapa Ishak Tribe talk about life before the spill, and how their community responded to the BP oil disaster.

Rosina recalls the devastating effects when the Gulf oil spill reached her home forty six days after the tragic event.

Rosina Philippe - Atakapa Ishak Tribe - Grand Bayou,La

Rosina Philippe - Atakapa Ishak Tribe - Grand Bayou,La

It came rolling into the bay. I mean tons of it, just thick orange. It was horrible. It just came in and it kept coming and there was nothing to stop it… [We] knew that it was coming in and everything it touched was going to die. And that’s just what happened.

WATCH VIDEO : 

Recorded in Buras, LA on October 20, 2010.
NRDC partnered with StoryCorps and Bridge the Gulf to record, share, and preserve the stories and experiences of those living through the BP oil disaster. Find out more at http://www.nrdc.org/storycorps

Last year around this time  Rosina spoke to the National Wildlife Federation about concerns for the future of life in Grand Bayou.

WATCH VIDEO : 

The Atakapa Ishak tribe of coastal Louisiana has inhabited the region for time without number. In the 21st century they still maintain a lifestyle and culture that is inherited from their ancestors. Now, in the wake of the BP Oil Spill, they struggle to keep their identity and their way of life.

posted on youtube by  on Jun 27, 2010

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